Foam Dressings

Foam Wound Dressings are usually made up of semipermeable polyurethane with small, open cells that are capable of holding fluids. The surface that comes in contact with the wound is non-adherent and allows for trauma-free removal. They create a moist wound healing environment by letting the moisture in but keep the bacteria and other contaminants out. Foam dressings for wounds are available in different sizes and shapes, some with adhesive tape or borders around the edges for easy application. Shop Wound Care offers a wide range of foam wound dressings from various top-selling brands like Optifoam, Mepilex, Tielle, Polymem, etc.

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Features of Foam Wound Dressings

Foam wound care dressings have the following features and properties:
  • Provide a warm, moist environment conducive to healing
  • Protect wound and peri-wound area from trauma
  • Do not adhere to the wound bed and allow for atraumatic removal
  • Serve as a cushion to protect the wound bed
  • Provide thermal insulation for the wound
  • Protect intact skin over friction areas or bony prominences
  • Easy to apply and remove
  • Good MVTR and O2 permeability
  • Provide a barrier against bacteria
  • Support autolytic debridement
  • May be used under compression
  • Conformable and comfortable
  • Non-linting

When to use Foam Wound Dressings?

Foam wound dressing can be used as a primary dressing to make direct contact with the wound surface or a secondary dressing to cover a primary dressing. It is indicated for the following:

  • Low to heavily exuding wounds
  • Partial or full-thickness wounds
  • Granulating and epithelialising wounds
  • May be used on infected wounds, cavity wounds or tunneling wounds
  • Lacerations and abrasions
  • Surgical wounds and incisions
  • Draining peristomal wounds
  • Stage II-IV pressure ulcers
  • Leg ulcers
  • Dermal ulcers
  • Donor sites
  • Skin tears
  • Burns

Contraindications of Foam Dressings

  • May cause peri-wound maceration in highly exuding wounds
  • Third-degree burns
  • Dry or non-draining wounds